Here’s a few videos from November of my first hive. Watching it now, I spot a big mistake. If you are not going to have some kind of winter cover on the hives, I should have reduced the size of the entrance to keep the cold air out and warm air in. You can buy entrance reducers or make one if you have a shop. You can’t totally lock them in – the bees venture out to use the bathroom every once in a while when the weather isn’t too bad.

This hive eventually died. A mouse family set up shop in there, and it didn’t make it through the next few months.

[iframe: src=”http://player.vimeo.com/video/2383271″ width=”400″ height=”300″ frameborder=”0″] [iframe: src=”http://player.vimeo.com/video/2383274″ width=”400″ height=”300″ frameborder=”0″]

26 Responses to “What Your Hive Looks Like In November”

  1. Brenda

    I have just discovered that the bees I thought could possibly be wild are probably from the 10 hives I just found about a 1/2 mile behind my grove. I live on 10 acres surrounded by farm country and old growth woods of oak and maple. If I start my own hive in my back yard are there going to be issues with the neighboring hives? How much distance should be between them?

    Reply
    • WorldOfBeekeeping

      Brenda,

      Thanks for the question!

      Neighboring hives shouldn’t be a problem.

      Think of it this way.

      Many people have multiple hives in their own backyards, or in commercial beekeeping settings. And they’re pretty close to each other. Much closer than 1/2 a mile by a long shot :-)

      You should be just fine if you’d like to start your own hive. :-)

      Reply
  2. Brenda

    Thanks. I am impatiently waiting for my kit to arrive so I can view the video in it’s entirety. Hoping to start my hive early next spring. I live in Minnesota and the idea of starting hive now doesn’t sound wise to me. Our winters tend to get a little out of hand here occasionally. (HaHa) Will the winter covers and reduced entry hole size be enough to protect my hive over the cold winter months and the feet of snow we always get?

    Reply
  3. Ted Stark

    Hey Ron,
    I have a hive that’s been abandoned for over a year. The structure is in good shape. Other than cleaning it up good and painting it, is there anything else I have to do before introducing bees to it again? I don’t know what happened to the original colony.. I think they died in the winter.
    thanks,
    Ted Stark
    Wyoming, Pa.

    Reply
  4. WorldOfBeekeeping

    Hey everyone!

    Thank you so much for your questions!

    We’re getting slammed with questions and are working on making videos to answer them.

    Look out in your email for updates!

    Reply
  5. Wayne Patten

    Hi Ron – Love your website and videos. I learn much from you tid-bit type excerpts. I live in Exeter, NH, near the Atlantic Ocean, where the climate is similar to yours, thus, your lessons prove valuable. Keep up the good work.

    Wayne

    Reply
  6. Al Wheatley

    Hey Ron, well I got a little sniff of collecting honey from a tree I had to remove, and I found all the honey combs in the trunk. During the removal and the hauling away of the trunk, the hive has been abandoned, I have removed all the honey combs but there are some with darker combs, possibly with larvae in them. My question is can this be harvested for honey as well, or should it just be discarded?

    Since this has happened my wife says that I am obsessed with honey bees, I have already purchased your DVD, and I have a ton of questions because I am anxious to start my own hive this spring!

    It’s great receiving all of your updates and information, I live in Windsor, Ontario , with one of the warmest climates in Canada, so I also appreciate all the over-wintering ideas for our cold winters as well.

    Keep up the good work,

    Al

    Reply
  7. Al Wheatley

    Hey Ron, well I got a little sniff of collecting honey from a tree I had to remove, and I found all the honey combs in the trunk. During the removal and the hauling away of the trunk, the hive has been abandoned, I have removed all the honey combs but there are some with darker combs, possibly with larvae in them. My question is can this be harvested for honey as well, or should it just be discarded?

    Since this has happened my wife says that I am obsessed with honey bees, I have already purchased your DVD, and I have a ton of questions because I am anxious to start my own hive this spring!

    It’s great receiving all of your updates and information, I live in Windsor, Ontario , with one of the warmest climates in Canada, so I also appreciate all the over-wintering ideas for our cold winters as well.

    Keep up the good work,

    Al

    Reply
  8. ken fletcher

    hi i have just purchased a beehive were is the best place to put it in my garden thanks

    Reply
  9. Ron Coomes

    I’m so new I haven’t but my hive together yet but I do have a couple of questions.
    I decidede to start with a top bar hive just to get my feet wet. I love the low maintenace concept but thought finding bees for the spring would be much easier. Queens are easy but what about the rest of the guy?

    I als just found out that I am moving from Kentucky to LA…Lower Alabama, this summer, should I just wait and start a hive there or can I partially summer them here and move them south when before winter sets in to give them time to set up food storage.

    I’m so clueless on this that I hope I don’t insult anyone but I have a facination with them and this is my first opportunity to set up a himve.

    thanks

    Ron

    Reply
  10. larry richardson

    Just getting started. Didn’t even know how to make smoke until I saw your video.
    I feed hummingbirds year round. My urban hives will be located about 50 feet (around a corner of the house) from hummingbird feeders. My question, will bees hurt birds or vice versa?

    Reply
  11. cal heath

    Hi Ron;
    A friend of mine set me up with some bees last sping. they seemed to be doing well. we took some frames out late in the fall and winterized the hive. I fed the bees until about the second week in December until the weather turned so cold it froze the water and sugar mixture. this past winter was the coldest ever. we had subfreezing temeratures into Feb. also a lot of snow. I opened the hives in mid Feb. to check the bees, no movement “Nada” later in Mar. I took the hives apart , lot of dead bees some honey not capped some frames and combs distorted. I have been trying to get intouch with the person who set me up with the bees. He works @ a power plant and his hours are to say the least irregular “I NEED HELP” thanks
    Cal

    Reply
  12. Larry

    Hello Ron so far i am doing a lot of studying and hoping to get in contact with a beekeeper not far from here for some hands on learning. Love your e mails and will keep you posted, Take care

    Reply
  13. Jerry Brandt

    I have a hive that has two deep frames almost full. I lost a hive last year that still had 30 pounds of honey it. Good for me, bad for them. Now, I have some left over Celotex which is about 3/8 inch thick with foil on each side. Can I put some of this on each side of the hive to keep out the cold? Thank You

    Reply
  14. Simon

    I just found hundreds of bees in a plastic container half full of my potting soil. I put the cover back on at night when they all quiet down. From this swarm ho do I tranfer that into a formal hive so I can get started. By the way even at night a group of ten or more flue into my sleeve and stang the Mcwillies out of my arm and side rib case and neck area.

    Anyway is it a good idea to modefy the box and I get started with a Hive?

    Greetings
    Simon Janson
    s.janson13@live.com

    Reply
  15. Rebecca

    Hello!
    I just watched your dvd and am very excited to get started. I do have some questions though.

    I live in northern Idaho in the mountains, and was wondering about our winters. We have very cold winters and get freezing temperatures even in the spring and fall. To give you an idea how cold it is I’ll tell you that we can’t even plant our garden till late June or early July and will get our fall frost late in August or early September. Is it possible to keep bees with our conditions?

    Reply
  16. al s

    You can’t block all entrances, will be no ventilation.
    Hot moist air get trapped.Moister will concentrate & rain on bees.
    Strong hive will tolerate cold, but not rain.
    If your hive strong they will expel mouse as well.

    Reply

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